Breakthroughs In Heart Health

Dr. Haider Warraich talks about advancements in treating and preventing heart failure, and explains how the understanding of healthy blood pressure and good cholesterol continues to evolve. His book is ‘State of the Heart.’

Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Hulu revival of ‘Veronica Mars,’ starring Kristen Bell.

Best Of: TV Critic Emily Nussbaum / Satirist Randy Rainbow

Emily Nussbaum, Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic for ‘The New Yorker,’ talks about the art of “terrible men” in the #MeToo era and TV’s revolution (from low brow to high art). Her new book of essays and reviews is ‘I Like to Watch.’

Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel ‘Copperhead’ by Alexi Zentner.

Randy Rainbow writes and performs satirical songs about President Trump set to melodies of show tunes. “I always considered song parody kind of cheap,” the Emmy-nominated performer says. “But … I’ve gotten [such a] response from others … that I’m appreciating it as an art form.”

50th Anniversary Of The Moon Landing

For the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, we’re listening back to archival interviews with Michael Collins, who circled the moon in the command capsule while Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong were on the moon’s surface; Alan Shepard, the first American in space; Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield; and test pilot Chuck Yeager, the first to break the sound barrier.

Corruption & Dysfunction In The Border Protection Agency

When Customs and Border Protection was formed after 9/11 (as a part of the Department of Homeland Security), many agents signed up for the job thinking it would be a quasi-military position, focused on catching terrorists and stopping drug smugglers. Journalist Garrett Graff says in recent years, the border patrol agents mostly have been doing humanitarian and administrative work for asylum-seekers. “It went out and built its ranks by recruiting Rambo, when it actually turns out that what the border patrol needs is Mother Teresa,” he says. Graff talks about the leadership vacuum that’s plagued the agency and worsened the border crisis.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews the new remake of ‘The Lion King.’

Satirist Randy Rainbow

Rainbow writes and performs satirical songs about President Trump set to melodies of show tunes. “I always considered song parody kind of cheap,” the Emmy-nominated performer says. “But … I’ve gotten [such a] response from others … that I’m appreciating it as an art form.”

Also, we remember retired Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens, who died yesterday at 99. He spoke with Terry Gross in 2011.

Novelist Colson Whitehead On ‘The Nickel Boys’

The Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist’s new book, ‘The Nickel Boys,’ is based on the true story of a notorious Florida reform school where many boys were beaten and sexually abused. Dozens of unmarked graves were discovered on the school grounds, which the state shut down in 2011. Maureen Corrigan reviews the novel, and then the author speaks with contributor Dave Davies.

Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews the book ‘Jazz from Detroit.’

TV Critic Emily Nussbaum

The Pulitzer Prize-winning TV critic for ‘The New Yorker’ talks about the art of “terrible men” in the #MeToo era, TV’s revolution (from low to high brow), and what she calls “the bad fan.” Her new book of essays and reviews is ‘I Like to Watch.’

Best Of: Yiddish ‘Fiddler On The Roof’ / How ‘Maiden’ Sailed Into History

A new Yiddish language production of ‘Fiddler on the Roof’ is currently running off-Broadway. Steven Skybell, who plays Tevye, and Joel Grey, who directs the show, explain why the play still resonates.

Film critic Justin Chang reviews the thriller ‘Midsommar.’

In 1989, 26-year-old skipper Tracy Edwards set out on what was considered an unthinkable journey for a woman — to sail the 33,000 mile Whitbread Round The World Race. She assembled an all-female crew, restored a shabby racing yacht, and took to sea. The new documentary ‘Maiden’ tracks their 9-month-long race and the sexism they faced at every turn. Edwards spoke with ‘Fresh Air’ contributor Dave Davies.

MLB’s Keith Hernandez / Remembering Pitcher Jim Bouton & Actor Rip Torn

The former first baseman played on championship teams with the Cardinals and Mets, and made a memorable appearance on ‘Seinfeld.’ His memoir, now out in paperback, is ‘I’m Keith Hernandez.’

MLB pitcher Jim Bouton, who died Wednesday, spoke to ‘Fresh Air’ in 1986 about his 1970 tell-all memoir, ‘Ball Four,’ in which he drew on his seven years with the Yankees to offer an insider’s guide to baseball.

Actor Rip Torn, who died Tuesday, won an Emmy Award for playing the gruff producer Artie on ‘The Larry Sanders Show.’ In 1994, he told Terry Gross that he based his character on Johnny Carson’s long time producer.

Also, critic John Powers reviews ‘London Kills,’ about a Scotland Yard team led by a detective whose wife has gone missing.

The Ongoing Crisis At The U.S.-Mexico Border

NY Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson has been documenting the impact of the Trump administration’s policies on migrants — and on the workers who deal with the large number of people held in detention. Dickerson talks about the squalid conditions at the Clint, Texas, border patrol center, where toddlers were living for weeks without diapers, and kids were living in cold, crowded holding areas without showers, clean clothes, toothbrushes, or enough food.

Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews ‘The Farewell,’ starring Awkwafina.